Roasted Pork Leg – Hornado de Chancho

Roasted pork leg recipe

En Español
This is my recipe for whole roasted pork leg, also known as hornado de pierna de chancho in Ecuador. This roasted pork leg is prepared by marinating the pork in a sauce of beer, garlic and spices. It is then slow roasted with butter and spices. Hornado is a traditional dish from Ecuador and is usually sold at stands or markets. Most of these places will roast the whole pig in a large outdoor clay oven.  The traditional recipe uses a typical drink made from fermented corn called chicha instead of beer, and also uses lard instead of butter. I made this for the first time several years ago on January 1st for a “hangover recovery” lunch. I would probably do it more often but would try to find a smaller sized pig leg, maybe a 10 pound one. I wasn’t able to find the pork leg at any of the regular grocery stores and found it a local butcher’s (it was the last one they had), so if you are planning to make hornado de chancho I would recommend ordering the pork leg in advance.

Ecuadorian hornado can be found at most markets during the entire year, but it’s more traditional to prepare it a home during special occasions or holidays. It is impossible to serve this roasted pork dish by itself. The side dishes are a very important part (and this is true for many Ecuadorian dishes). I can’t imagine eating hornado without tasting the mote (hominy) or curtido or avocado in the same bite. There are a lot of options for side dishes, and these will vary from one region to another; or from one restaurant to another. The sides also depend on each person’s personal preferences (and the ingredients and time you have available). Since the pork is roasted in beer and butter, it will leave lot of juices in roasting pan. I love to add whole potatoes during the last hours, they turn out delicious and very tender since they cook in the pork sauce.

Roasted pork leg Hornado de chancho con mote

This recipe is time consuming as the pork leg needs to marinate for three days. This is the optimal way of preparing it so that all the flavors sink in to the meat, however it is possible to marinate for only a day or a couple of hours. I have another recipe for a quicker version of hornado that can be made with a smaller sized piece of meat and in less time.

Roasted pork leg

Suggested side dishes for hornado roasted pork:

Mote frito en salsa de hornado / Hominy sautéed in roasted pork gravy sauce

Curtido de cebolla y tomate / Pickled red onion and tomato salad

Platanos maduros fritos / Fried plantains

Aji criollo / Fresh spicy salsa

Agrio sauce

Llapingachos / Stuffed potato patties

Rice

Yuca

Avocado slices

Lettuce

Hornado de chancho – Roasted Pork Leg

Yield: Serves about 30-40 people

Hornado de chancho – Roasted Pork Leg

Whole roasted pork leg or hornado de pierna de chancho, prepared by marinating the pork in a sauce of beer, garlic and spices. Slow roasted with butter and spices.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Make sure the pork leg is clean and place it in a large non-reactive roasting pan (make sure it will fit in the fridge as well as the oven).
  2. Prepare the “aliño” by mixing the crushed garlic, ground cumin, salt and pepper.
  3. Drizzle the lime juice all over the pork leg.
  4. Make several deep incisions on both sides of pork leg and begin stuffing the incisions with the “aliño”, also rub the “aliño” all over the meat. Let rest for 24 hours in the fridge.
  5. Pour the 8 cups of beer over the pork leg and let it marinade for another 48 hours, turning the leg every 6-8 hours.
  6. Pre-heat oven to 400F (200C), let the pork leg bake for about 30 minutes.
  7. In the meantime, in a small saucepan, melt a stick of butter on low heat, stir in the 1 tablespoon of the ground achiote and mix well.
  8. Lower the oven temperature to 350F and pour the melted butter mix on the pork leg.
  9. To keep the pork leg from drying out you will need to “bañar” or bathe the pork leg using a soup ladle with the pan sauces about every 20 minutes.
  10. When the pan sauces start to dry up, melt the remaining 2 butter sticks on low heat, mix in the remaining 6 cups of beer and 1 tablespoon of ground achiote and pour over the pork leg. Make sure the mix is hot to keep the pork skin from cracking.
  11. Turn the pork leg over after about 3 hours of cooking and lower the temperature to 325F. Continue bathing every 20 minutes.
  12. After 3 hours, turn the leg back over, some of the skin might have begun to peel off due to being directly in the sauce, try to place the skin back in place and bake for the last 2 hours. Add the potatoes at this point if you want to bake the potatoes with the pig leg, they will absorb the yummy sauces and be delicious.
  13. Total roasting time should be about 8 hours for a 20 pound pork leg, internal temperature should be 160.
  14. Before removing the leg from the oven, sprinkle cold water on the skin for it to “reventar” or pop (this is optional).
  15. Serve with your choice of side dishes including the potatoes baked with the pork leg, mote blanco frito, curtido de cebolla y tomate, avocado slices, lettuce and aji. Other popular side dishes for hornado include rice, yuca, and llapingachos.
http://laylita.com/recipes/2008/01/05/hornado-de-chancho-roasted-pork-leg/

Make deep incisions in the pork skin to fill with the garlic cumin mix Roasting a whole pork leg

You can add potatoes during the last hours and let them cook the pork sauce Hornado de pierna de chancho

Roasted pork recipe Ecuadorian roasted porkEcuadorian hornado de chancho plate Hornado de chancho

Roasted pork leg or hornado de chancho

 

 

Comments

  1. Alex Maynez says:

    Hello Laylita,
    My suegra is very secretive of this recipe. Not sure if these are her “secret” ingredients. I’m going to try this for Christmas. I did notice that she covers the whole chancho leg with aluminum. I plan on making mine in a large covered metal roasting pan. Do you cover yours at all?
    Thanks,
    Alex

    • Hi Alex, It depends on the exact size of leg (and sometimes the oven), I cover it if it starts to get too golden/brown and there’s still a lot of baking time left. And then I’ll uncover it again at then end so that it can finish browning as needed.

  2. Estoy buscando hacer esta receta para una ocasión especial que se avecina, pero solamente somos dos personas.
    ¿Me puedes indicar con un link dónde está la receta más corta y más pequeña para hacer hornado?

    Hola Andres – Acabo de poner esa receta y esta aqui: http://laylita.com/recipes/2012/11/08/ecuadorian-hornado-or-slow-roasted-pork/

  3. Cissy Vaughn says:

    Leg of Pork:
    1. Is the the front legs, or the hams on the back legs? Back legs
    2. When making the deep incisions on the leg, do you cut through the skin as well, or pull it back, stuff, and then replace the skin back over the incisions? I did a few cuts though the skin, but it’s very tough so also under the skin
    3. How long and how deep are the incisions? 1-2 inches both deep and long

    I have several small pigs that I want to process relatively small (100 pounds) in order to quarter them and have easy to handle pieces of meat to cook in recipes such as this that won’t be overwhelming for a childless couple!

    Thank you so much for your time.
    Cissy

  4. This looks really good. How long for a 10 or 15 lbs roast?

    Usually about 25-30 minutes for pound – internal temp for pork should be at 160F

  5. 20 Pounds?

    Maybe it can get scaled down to a pork shoulder of 6 to 8 pounds…
    My biggest problem is the skin… in Gye, they make the skin extra crispy by removing it at some point either before or during cooking and it’s served on top of the “sanduche”

    Thanks for this recipe.

    Hi Xavier – I’ve added a recipe for a smaller piece of pork: http://laylita.com/recipes/2012/11/08/ecuadorian-hornado-or-slow-roasted-pork/. For the pork skin, it can be done while cooking or at end put in under the broiler (with or without removing it from the meat – though I find that removing it is easier)

  6. Cecilia says:

    HI
    I’VE BEEN MAKING “HORNADO” THE WAY I THOUGHT IT WAS… BUT AFTER READING THIS RECETA, I JUST CAN’T GET OVER ON HOW WRONG I WAS…LOL… SO MUCH WORK THAT GOES INTO MAKING THIS DISH, NO WONDER IT TASTES SO WONDERFUL WHEN YOU EAT IT IN ECUADOR…I’LL MAKE IT THIS WAY NEXT TIME..ONE MORE THING.. I WAS WONDERING IF MAYBE YOU COULD GET YOUR HANDS ON THE RECIPE FOR ALLUYAS… AND ALSO QUESADILLAS, NOT THE MEXICAN KIND… THE KIND THAT YOU EAT WITH ICE CREAM IN QUITO.. THEY ARE SOME KIND OF PASTRY… THANK YOU!… LOVE THE WEBSITE!

  7. Que perfeito!! Meu marido é equatoriano, mais somente sabe comer. Nada de receitas.Neste fim do ano vou fazer o Hornado. Depois conto.
    Feliz 2010!!!!!!

  8. Hola Laylita, gracias por tu receta, esta semana lo hago, lo tengo el el fridge con la cerveza….

  9. Mmmmmmmmm……..Delicious.

  10. Muchas gracias por la receta, una exelente receta.

    Los Ecuatorianos en el exterior necesitamos estas paginas para poder mantener vivas nuestras costumbres.

    Abrasos

  11. Hi there. I ate this at Carnival de Pueblo in South London. I was wondering what the white ‘pop corn’ type beans are on the front corner of the plate in the second photo?

    That is hominy corn, also called mote. More info on it can be found here: http://laylita.com/recipes/2009/01/16/mote-or-hominy/

  12. Thank you thank you thank you

  13. ingrid quartermaine says:

    i am so happy i found your web site. my husband is from ecuador and i am facinated with the way his mother cooks. all of these traditional recipies i have seen on her dinner table. iv often had questions about dishes and found the lauguage a challenge to understand the names in english.i hope you always keep this sight as it is amazing and you explain in such detail. god bless.

  14. Hi, Laylita.
    Thank you for all those wonderfull recipes. I just wonder how do you make the pork juice for the pork sandwich ( sanduche de chancho ). I just love that in Guayaquil.

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